MDGs

We will have time to reach the Millennium Development Goals—worldwide and in most, or even all, individual countries—but only if we break with business as usual.

We will have time to reach the Millennium Development Goals—worldwide and in most, or even all, individual countries—but only if we break with business as usual.
KOFI ANNAN, UN SECRETARY-GENERAL (1997-2006)

Millennium Development Goals

The MDGs—set forth at the United Nations in 2000 and endorsed by all member states—are the world’s shared framework for development.

The MDGs reflect an understanding of the many interconnected factors that contribute to extreme poverty and include time-bound and measurable targets to address income poverty, hunger, disease, lack of adequate shelter and exclusion—while promoting gender equality, education and environmental sustainability. Bill Gates has called them “the best idea for focusing the world on fighting global poverty that [he has] ever seen.” They have seen remarkable progress, including a 74 percent reduction in measles deaths, 4 million people on life-saving AIDS treatment, and more than 30 million additional children in primary school in Africa alone. The success stories each have major lessons for scale up, including sound technical interventions, institutional mechanisms to deliver services, adequate finance to reach scale, and a clear focus on metrics. Ten years ago most were widely considered unachievable.

THE MDGS -- SET FORTH BY THE UN IN 2000 AND ENDORSED BY 192 NATIONS --  PROVIDE THE WORLD’S SHARED FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPMENT. TO BE ACHIEVED BY 2015 THE MDGS — SET FORTH BY THE UN IN 2000 AND ENDORSED BY ALL MEMBER NATIONS — PROVIDE THE WORLD’S SHARED FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPMENT. TO BE ACHIEVED BY 2015

mdg_waterThe Millennium Villages Project

The Millennium Villages Project aims to spur broad scaling up of integrated rural investments for achieving the MDGs. This scale-up is only possible if ODA promises come true.

The MVP will be successful if it:

  • Demonstrates the feasibility of integrated investments to achieve the MDGs in impoverished rural Africa.
  • Helps to create new models for community-based delivery, monitoring, and measurement.
  • Plays a constructive role in helping the global aid commitments come to pass by making the MVP lessons widely known within Africa and internationally.
  • Helps to encourage increased global public financial flows toward more practical and effective ground-level investments rather than to low quality aid.

Examples of Proven Interventions Implemented in the MVP

  • Low food yields can be improved through fertilizers, seeds and irrigation technologies.
  • Malaria can be prevented through the rapid distribution of low-cost, insecticide-treated bed nets; malaria deaths can be reduced by ensuring access to effective medicines.
  • HIV can be prevented through public education programs and access to condoms; AIDS deaths can be reduced through access to antiretroviral medicines.
  • Maternal mortality can be reduced by increasing access to emergency obstetrical care.
  • Primary school enrolment can be increased by eliminating school fees, training teachers and providing locally-produced school meals and separate latrines for girls.
  • Access to markets and income-generating opportunities can be improved by developing essential infrastructure, such as roads, ports and networks for information communications technologies.